INVESTIGATION OF MICRORNA LEVELS IN BLOOD PLASMA IN PREGNANT WOMEN WITH GESTATIONAL ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION, PREECLAMPSIA, AND FETAL GROWTH RETARDATION SYNDROME

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Abstract


MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs (20-24 nucleotides) that regulate gene expression through post-transcriptional repression or degradation of the template RNA. The role of microRNA during pregnancy is currently poorly understood. Some studies have identified a microRNA profile associated with pregnancy since it was present in the placenta and maternal blood throughout pregnancy. In this study, we compared individual expression levels of 10 microRNAs in the maternal peripheral blood samples and further estimated their association with adverse pregnancy outcomes including preeclampsia, gestational arterial hypertension, and fetal growth retardation syndrome. MicroRNAs can be used as a non-invasive biomarker to identify an adverse obstetric outcome and with the potent therapeutic target for the prevention or treatment of pathology of pregnancy. Further research with a large sample size in different populations is needed to confirm our results.

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About the authors

Andrey V. Murashko

I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, V.F. Snegirev Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Email: murashkoa@mail.ru
Moscow, 119045, Russian Federation
MD, PhD, DSci., Professor, Head of the Department of pathology of pregnancy of the V.F. Snegirev Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, 119045, Russian Federation; researcher of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology No 1 of the I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, 119991, Russian Federation

M. S Simonova

I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, V.F. Snegirev Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Moscow, 119045, Russian Federation

A. G Goryunova

I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, V.F. Snegirev Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Moscow, 119045, Russian Federation

D. K Chebanov

I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, V.F. Snegirev Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Moscow, 119045, Russian Federation

A. A Abramov

I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, V.F. Snegirev Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Moscow, 119045, Russian Federation

E. Yu Chaplygin

I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, V.F. Snegirev Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Moscow, 119045, Russian Federation

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