Dominant Lactobacillus spp. in different conditions of vaginal microbiocenosis

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Abstract

The vaginal microbiota is a primary non-specific barrier that protects against various bacterial, viral and fungal pathogens. A normal microflora of the female genital tract is represented by aerobes, facultative and strict anaerobes. Bacteria of the genus Lactobacillus spp. dominate the majority of women of reproductive age. They have high protective properties against other microorganisms. Lactobacillus spp. prevent an excessive reproduction of opportunistic and pathogenic microorganisms in the vaginal biotope due to the synthesis of short-chain acids that maintain the pH value in the normal range. As a rule, one or two species of Lactobacillus spp. dominate in the vaginal biotope, which are responsible for ensuring homeostasis of the vaginal microflora. At the same time, various Lactobacillus spp. differ in their protective properties. L. crispatus is a marker of the stability of the vaginal microflora. With the dominance of this type of lactobacillus, the authors of the studies observed a low risk of bacterial vaginosis, aerobic vaginitis, and unwanted obstetric complications during pregnancy and in assisted reproductive technology protocols, as well as a reduced risk of infection with sexually transmitted infections and human papillomavirus. L. gasseri and L. iners were more often detected in women with intermediate microflora or with dysbiosis. L. iners, unlike L. crispatus, has reduced protective properties and is widespread in dysbiotic conditions of the vaginal microflora. The detection of L. iners can serve as a prognostic sign of the development of pathological conditions of the vaginal microflora.

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About the authors

Natalia A. Kalinina

V.I. Vernadsky Crimean Federal University

Email: natali.broun@yandex.ua
ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5828-4160
Russian Federation, 5/7 Lenina Blvd., Simferopol, 295006, Republic of Crimea

Anna N. Sulima

V.I. Vernadsky Crimean Federal University

Email: gsulima@yandex.ru
ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2671-6985
SPIN-code: 2232-0458
Scopus Author ID: 57214970506
ResearcherId: P-3191-2015

MD, Dr. Sci. (Med.), Professor

Russian Federation, 5/7 Lenina Blvd., Simferopol, 295006, Republic of Crimea

Zoya S. Rumyantseva

V.I. Vernadsky Crimean Federal University

Email: zoyarum@inbox.ru
ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1711-021X
SPIN-code: 3480-3514

MD, Cand. Sci. (Med.), Assistant Professor

Russian Federation, 5/7 Lenina Blvd., Simferopol, 295006, Republic of Crimea

Anatoliy N. Rybalka

V.I. Vernadsky Crimean Federal University

Email: office@ma.cfuv.ru
ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2786-5218
SPIN-code: 3710-5727
Scopus Author ID: 7003634390
ResearcherId: F-3523-2017

MD, Dr. Sci. (Med.), Professor

Russian Federation, 5/7 Lenina Blvd., Simferopol, 295006, Republic of Crimea

Petr N. Baskakov

V.I. Vernadsky Crimean Federal University

Email: petr.baskakov@gmail.com
ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7382-7434
SPIN-code: 8451-2600
ResearcherId: F-4520-2017

MD, Dr. Sci. (Med.), Professor

Russian Federation, 5/7 Lenina Blvd., Simferopol, 295006, Republic of Crimea

Viktoriya V. Voronaya

V.I. Vernadsky Crimean Federal University

Email: viktoria.voronaya@yandex.ru
ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3972-0681
SPIN-code: 1753-9947

MD, Cand. Sci. (Med.)

Russian Federation, 5/7 Lenina Blvd., Simferopol, 295006, Republic of Crimea

Anastasiya S. Lyashenko

North-Western State Medical University named after I.I. Mechnikov

Author for correspondence.
Email: helen.lyashen@mail.ru
ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0284-7649
Russian Federation, Saint-Petersburg

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