HIV infection, secondary conditions and comorbidities. Part 1: Epidemiology and the basis of the problem

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  • Authors: Belyakov N.A.1,2,3, Rassokhin V.V.1,2,3, Stepanova E.V.1,4, Leonova O.N.1,4, Boeva E.V.1,2
  • Affiliations:
    1. Pavlov First Saint Petersburg State Medical University
    2. Saint Petersburg Pasteur Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology
    3. Institute of Experimental Medicine
    4. Saint Petersburg Centre for Prevention and Control of AIDS and Infectious Diseases
  • Issue: Vol 18, No 4 (2018)
  • Pages: 7-16
  • Section: Articles
  • URL: https://journals.eco-vector.com/MAJ/article/view/11680
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.17816/MAJ1847-16
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Abstract


An analysis of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic’s trajectory with priority-setting taking into account HIV-associated comorbidities for each time period was performed. A classification of comorbid diseases and conditions in HIV infection by cause and setting of their occurrence is presented. Opportunistic infections and secondary diseases that remain some of the leading causes of severe complications and mortality are characterized. The difficulty of the development of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome against the background of late diagnosis of HIV infection and initiation of antiretroviral therapy is highlighted.


Nikolay A. Belyakov

Pavlov First Saint Petersburg State Medical University; Saint Petersburg Pasteur Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology; Institute of Experimental Medicine

Author for correspondence.
Email: ras-doc@mail.ru

Russian Federation, 6/8, Lva Tolstogo street, St. Petersburg, 197089; 14, Mira street, Saint Petersburg, 197101; 12, Academic Pavlov street, Saint-Petersburg, 197376

MD, PhD, Professor, Academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Head of the Department of Socially Significant Infections; Head of the North-Western District AIDS Prevention and Control Center; Head of the Department of Socially Significant Infections

Vadim V. Rassokhin

Pavlov First Saint Petersburg State Medical University; Saint Petersburg Pasteur Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology; Institute of Experimental Medicine

Email: ras-doc@mail.ru

Russian Federation, 6/8, Lva Tolstogo street, St. Petersburg, 197089; 14, Mira street, Saint Petersburg, 197101; 12, Academic Pavlov street, Saint-Petersburg, 197376

MD, PhD, Professor of the Department of Socially Significant Infections; Leading research associate; Head of the Laboratory of Chronic Viral Infections, Department of Ecological Physiology

Elena V. Stepanova

Pavlov First Saint Petersburg State Medical University; Saint Petersburg Centre for Prevention and Control of AIDS and Infectious Diseases

Email: boeva@gmail.com

Russian Federation, 6/8, Lva Tolstogo street, St. Petersburg, 197089; 179a, Obvodny Canal Embankment, St. Petersburg, 190103

Professor, Department of Socially Significant Infections; MD, PhD, Deputy Chief Medical Officer

Olga N. Leonova

Pavlov First Saint Petersburg State Medical University; Saint Petersburg Centre for Prevention and Control of AIDS and Infectious Diseases

Email: boeva@gmail.com

Russian Federation, 6/8, Lva Tolstogo street, St. Petersburg, 197089; 179a, Obvodny Canal Embankment, St. Petersburg, 190103

MD, PhD, Associate Professor of the Department of Socially Significant Infections; Head of the Saint Petersburg Center for Prevention and Control of AIDS and Infectious Diseases

Ekaterina V. Boeva

Pavlov First Saint Petersburg State Medical University; Saint Petersburg Pasteur Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology

Email: boeva@gmail.com

Russian Federation, 6/8, Lva Tolstogo street, St. Petersburg, 197089; 14, Mira street, Saint Petersburg, 197101

Assistant of the Department of socially significant infections; Head of the Department of Chronic Viral Infection

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Supplementary files

Supplementary Files Action
1. Fig. 1. HIV-associated comorbid diseases and conditions. IDU — injection drug usage; HIV — human immunodeficiency virus; DM — diabetes mellitus; AIDs — autoimmune diseases View (94KB) Indexing metadata
2. Fig. 2. Pathogenesis of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. ART — antiretroviral therapy, HIV — human immunodeficiency virus, IL — interleukin, IFN — interferon, RNA — ribonucleic acid, TNF — tumor necrosis factor View (48KB) Indexing metadata

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Copyright (c) 2018 Belyakov N.A., Rassokhin V.V., Stepanova E.V., Leonova O.N., Boeva E.V.

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